How to Plant a Perennial Food Garden In 3 Simple Steps

How to Plant a Perennial Food Garden In 3 Simple Steps

If you own your home or plan to live there for several years, it is worth gardening perennial food.

Initially, it involves the same amount of work as an annual garden, however, in later years, the plants need less attention and produce more than your standard garden.

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Here's how to plant and establish your perennial garden.

Step 1. The Spot

How to Plant a Perennial Food Garden In 3 Simple Steps

Choose a permanent spot for your perennial garden.

Because your plants will survive in the same spot year after year, you should carefully consider where you will plant each one.

Some perennial plants, such as mint or horseradish, can become invasive and take over the garden from nearby plants.

Choose your spot carefully and keep the plant within boundaries.

Step 2. Preparing the Garden

How to Plant a Perennial Food Garden In 3 Simple Steps

Once you have decided where you will plant, prepare the bed well.

You need to give the plants a good start so that you will have a good root system and healthy plant for the future.

Give it a good dose of compost or fertilizer and turn the soil to loosen it. 

Dig compost and other needed amendments into the soil and keep the area well weeded for the first year or two while the plants become established.

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Aggressive perennials, such as Jerusalem artichokes, mint, or self-seeding herbs need their own bed or containers.

Give the beds a generous layer of mulch or compost to increase fertility in the future and discourage weeds.

Step 3. Caring 

How to Plant a Perennial Food Garden In 3 Simple Steps

Caring for perennial gardens.

Taking care of a perennial garden is no different than caring for annuals. However, once established, the plants need little care.

Give them fresh fertilizer, compost, and mulch each spring. Their deeper root systems give them an advantage; but they still need water during drought conditions. 

What to Plant

Fruits and Nuts

How to Plant a Perennial Food Garden In 3 Simple Steps

Fruit and nut trees and berry bushes take longer to produce, so I would recommend planting them first.

However, there is much to consider before planting trees and bushes. Remember, they will become permanent fixtures in your yard or garden, so planning their location is important.

Too many trees may block all sun to the lot, preventing you from planting other crops. 

Consider their growth patterns, how much room they need, and whether they will cast too much shade on other parts of the garden. 

Herb Garden

How to Plant a Perennial Food Garden In 3 Simple Steps

The second recommendation would be to plant a perennial herb garden.

There are many herbs that are perennials, especially in temperate and tropical climates.

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Here are some suitable herbs for a perennial garden:

  • Bronze Fennel
  • Chives
  • Comfrey
  • Echinacea
  • Edible Hibiscus
  • French Tarragon
  • Garlic
  • Horseradish
  • Lavender
  • Lemon Balm
  • Lovage
  • Mint
  • Oregano
  • Rosemary
  • Sage
  • Sorrel
  • Thyme
  • Watercress

Vines

How to Plant a Perennial Food Garden In 3 Simple Steps

Vining fruits such as grapes, hardy kiwi, maypops or wild passion flowers are perennials that produce year after year.

Most take at least 3 years to begin fruiting and need special support. Remember grape leaves are also edible.

Pick the young tender leaves in the spring, older leaves are bitter.

Vegetable Garden

How to Plant a Perennial Food Garden In 3 Simple Steps

There are surprisingly many vegetables that are perennials.

Some are annuals in colder climates, while others require cold weather to produce fruit. Choose vegetables and varieties that are suitable for your climate and soil types.

These vegetables are perennial in the zones listed:

  • Artichokes
  • Asparagus
  • Early Purple Sprouting Broccoli
  • Jerusalem Artichoke
  • Kale 
  • Spinach
  • Radicchio
  • Rhubarb

As you see, if you own your home or plan to live there for several years, it is worth gardening perennial food.

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Initially, it involves the same amount of work as an annual garden, however, in later years, the plants need less attention and produce more than your standard garden.

Know you know how to plant and establish your perennial garden.

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